Measured Repetition Is The Basis Of Success In Microlearning

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Measured Repetition Is The Basis Of Success In Microlearning

Repetition is a staple of skill acquisition. Meaningful practice, under almost every educational model, involves repetition as a skill acquisition prerogative. A premise which hasn’t been more alive today than in microlearning.

Given the constraints and focuses, (limited time, attention span), the ideal microlearning design should leverage context-aware repetition. It could follow in a number of ways:

  • Straightforward repetition, focusing on familiarity and speed;
  • Context shifting, in which a given set of skills are extrapolated to new, more realistic realities;
  • and “Meshing,” in which the several topics that are being learned play out simultaneously in a real-life scenario, influencing one another.

From a measurement standpoint, these three are a clear path of evolution toward a more evidence-practice, and a culture of analytics if taken to heart by the team.

Bring on the xAPI micro-statements

A discussion in the Moodle Forum highlights the expectations surrounding both microlearning and Learning Record Stores. What are the possible roles for both in, say, K-12 Moodle courses? Texan Moodler Ken Tasks leads with a measured enthusiasm. Whenever teachers are able to figure out how to add an xAPI layer to the activities they use, and in return get a clearer picture of how the student learn, it will not be difficult to extend the idea across the many moments in which learning takes place, starting with microlearning.

The real feedback loop reinforces the notion that microlearning must be fine-tuned. As the intervention is matched more or less in real time with a practical outcome, microlearning has the potential to become effective quickly.


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